NO PAIN, NO GAIN

This Burberry dress with its pretty bejeweled collar often – depending on the posture – makes me look pregnant. That’s because of its Empire waistline combined with a balloon-shaped skirt. But at the end of the day, looking like you’re pregnant isn’t the worst thing that could happen once you stop running after a skinny figure.

From here, let me introduce a subject that’s been bugging me recently: plastic surgery, the youth culture and the skinny culture.

Personally, I wouldn’t go for plastic surgery for two reasons. First, one of my golden rules is fully accepting yourself, be it your little flaws or the passing of time that imprints itself on your body and soul. I find that Audrey Hepburn is much more beautiful old than young: she was lovely before but lacked that particular aura that came with age. Second, I’ve got an absolute fear of someone introducing foreign products into my body. It’s just impossible.

Beyond that very personal opinion, I’ve often been surprised by the negative opinion people have of plastic surgery. I’ve never really understand why it is bad, given that most of us constantly strive to modify our bodies through diets and sports. How is it wrong to get rid of extra fat or to tighten and lift skin when it sags? How is it so bad that nearly no public persona admits to using it?

Diets and sports are accepted in our societies because they aim at providing a better quality of life and better health. But we mustn’t fool ourselves: the objective is (often and for a majority) really all about modifying our physical appearance (but some also just like eating healthy and working out because it makes them feel good).

Yet the criticism of surgery often comes from those who inflict unhealthy training programs and diets upon themselves, with the exact same goal of changing their appearance. And that’s why I don’t understand the double standard.

Coming back to diets and training, I understand that they’re accepted because of the supposed effort they imply, and God knows our judeo-christian heritage loves correlating gain and effort. Perhaps that’s why there’s a double standard: you can change what you look like only if you work hard for it. Unhealthy diets and overtraining are okay, only if you pretend to do it for the lifestyle part. Undergoing surgery for the same reasons? Nope.

That’s the only explanation I can find for this perpetual criticism of plastic surgery.

Anyhow, in my case, the race to youth, through any means, seems vain and useless. Vain in every way: vain because it will fail no matter what and vain because it suggests an internal void.

As always, it’s the reason that pushes to act that really matters. Eating healthy because you want to, working out because it cleanses your body and soul, that’s fine. Using surgery because you’ve got a real insecurities that you can’t overcome, that’s fine as well.

Doing all of that just to look young and desirable seems problematic. I’ll never judge someone who does that but I do feel like it translates a certain misunderstanding of the meaning of life.

 

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris Juillet 2017

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris Juillet 2017

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris Juillet 2017

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris Juillet 2017

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris Juillet 2017

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris Juillet 2017

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris Juillet 2017

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris Juillet 2017

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris Juillet 2017

Burberry dress – Prada heels – Bulgari purse – Paul & Joe sunglasses

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