COURREGES

Today’s subject of discussion is none other than one of the most vanguard Parisian brands, the famous maison Courrèges, which was one of the first to offer trousers and miniskirts to women.

André Courrèges studied civil engineering, was raised by Balenciaga and was truly passionate about architecture. This unusual life-path – rather coherent when you think about it – accounts for the structured design of his creations, which is consistently combined with a freed ’68 femininity that liberates the female body from any constraints. Farewell waist-cinchers, corsets and high heels.

Though this dress may not be as iconic as some of Courrèges’ other creations, it encapsulates the spirit of the designer: perfectly structured, perfectly feminine (and perfectly liberating, should I add, at this stage a freer bust is a naked bust).

This beautiful vintage dress is also an expression of my reaction to the Western social phenomenon of FOMO (Fear of Missing Out), also known as the permanent fear of missing out on something, be it a sale, an event or an information.

The Internet’s omnipotence created a constant flow of information, it made it possible to buy online at any time, to attend any event – in a nutshell, it put the world at your fingertips.

But as a consequence, FOMO is also at your fingertips. It’s so easy to let FOMO creep up on you without even realizing it, to stay glued to your phone, checking your social media on loop, or the news, or any notification or alarm that you may have activated.

Addiction is on our doorsteps, and everything pushes us to invite it in: the constant online sales of collections that we struggle to keep up with because they seem to be changing every week (thanks a lot, fast fashion), the permanent tsunami of information we are bombarded with, the impossible choice between 60 Facebook events. At the end of the day, we just consume and live whatever we can get our hands on: clothes bought on a whim, biased, irrelevant information and uninteresting events.

Vintage has an enormous advantage when it comes to these kinds of social phenomena: it can’t just be bought on a whim. When you buy a vintage item, it’s not just the material good you’re acquiring but also the story it carries, a story you may be told if you get lucky. Vintage shopping isn’t always fruitful, it is time-consuming and requires lots of care and thought. Vintage shops are like Ali Baba’s cave and shopping in them should be thought of as a treasure hunt.

And this is today’s vintage treasure.

 

Marquis Paris - Petit Palais

Marquis Paris - Petit Palais

Marquis Paris - Petit Palais

Marquis Paris - Petit Palais

Marquis Paris - Petit Palais

Marquis Paris - Petit Palais

Marquis Paris - Petit Palais

Marquis Paris - Petit Palais

Marquis Paris - Petit Palais

Marquis Paris - Petit Palais

Vintage Courrèges dress – Dior heels – Fendi clutch – Vintage gloves

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